The Foils and Follies of Drone Data Collection

Drone collects imageryChelsea E | Projections
A drone flies over the Blue Marble Geographics headquarters in Hallowell, Maine collecting imagery to be used in software testing.

Over the past few months, the Blue Marble team has taken on the challenge of collecting drone imagery of our property for testing exciting new features coming soon to Global Mapper. As we began to step into the fairly new commercial UAV field, we realized that there are few assumptions we can make. First of all, there is a learning curve that comes with simply flying a drone to take pictures or collect imagery. There are also a number of legal hurdles, safety concerns, and practical challenges to consider. We needed guidance as we began this initiative, from which we learned a few important lessons.

Drone Flight Concerns and Considerations

Though it appears to be a relatively simple technical challenge, flying a drone has legal and safety considerations that were readily apparent to us but may not be common knowledge. Our first concern was that the Blue Marble headquarters are only about a mile and half, as the crow (or should I say UAV) flies, from the Augusta State Airport. Small planes fly overhead frequently and quite low at times. We were not sure if our building was located near banned airspace. Our second concern was that our property abuts the Hall-Dale elementary school playground. A location that is full of children three or four times a day during business hours. What if we crashed in the school yard while children were at recess? What a PR nightmare.

These concerns about the airport and school property were enough to stall us from simply buying or building a drone, and prompted us to seek guidance. Fortunately for us, the University of Maine at Augusta offers an unmanned aerial vehicle training course taught by certified pilots. A quick call to one of the faculty members for more information resulted in the gentlemen visiting our offices to conduct some test flights and to share a bit of their knowledge with us. We learned a great deal even from our first test.

Programming drone flight pathChelsea E | Projections
Certified UAV pilot Dan Leclair uses his laptop to set up a flight path for a drone to fly over the Blue Marble Geographics headquarters in Hallowell, Maine.

Setting Up the Drone for Flight

Certified pilots Dan Leclair and Greg Gilda joined us at our office on a beautiful, clear and wind-free day in early October. They confirmed that we could fly over our property with some stipulations, despite our location near a commercial airport. As a precaution, the gentlemen brought with them a hand-held radio to monitor pilot communication in the area as we set up our flight path. They also reassured us that there was little chance of the drone flying off of our property during school recess, since the drone would be programmed and flown on autopilot. Dan and Greg shared a litany of information about how the drones now have homing devices, automatically avoid collisions with structures, and fly on a pre-programmed flight pattern. If, for some reason, it did fly over school property, we could manually fly it back. We also learned that the drone must stay within our view to remain in compliance with Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) regulation, which was no problem. We weren’t flying a large area anyway.

As we chose and programmed the drone flight path with a laptop, the pilots focused on a very common issue for us GIS folks — proper elevation above ground. Since we are located in the descent path of planes landing at the airport, we needed to keep the drone relatively low to avoid any potential, and of course unwanted, collisions with an aircraft. We decided that we would fly at 100 feet above ground on a path that was 1,793 feet long and would take about 3 minutes.

Drone cameraChelsea E | Projections
We also set up the drone camera for the light conditions, and programmed it to capture an image every two seconds during the flight.

The software the pilots used had some short comings in that the user had to manually select points for the back-and-forth flight path we wanted. As a software guy, this seemed tedious. I would rather draw a quick polygon or box around my area of interest and have that converted to a flight pattern. Perhaps that could be a new feature for Global Mapper Mobile in the future? In this case, our area of interest was our building, so it did not take long to manually designate the flight pattern by selecting waypoints for the drone to fly back and forth. We also set up the drone camera for the light conditions, and programmed it to capture an image every two seconds during the flight. One practical lesson we learned was that a good staging area for the laptop is preferable on a sunny day. We used the back of an SUV for the shade, so we could see the laptop screen and comfortably program the software.

After a bit of work we were ready to fly.

Rotors are attached to droneChelsea E | Projections
Certified UAV pilot Greg Gilda puts the rotors on the drone before it’s sent on a flight path over the Blue Marble headquarters.

Flying the Drone and Collecting Data

We set the drone on a circular landing pad made of nylon near the back of our property. Greg attached the rotor blades, very carefully I might add. The blades attach rather easily to the quad copter by snapping into place. Dan explained that this step was done before turning the drone on, saying something to the effect of “you don’t want to lose a finger”.

Once the UAV was ready to fly we all stepped back. Dan launched it into the air with the touch of a button or two, and the drone began its pre-programmed flight path. For those experienced pilots, you might notice that we did not discuss ground control. More on that in a later blog entry, I suppose, but these early tests were not including that. The flight went seamlessly and Dan only took over manual control as he brought the drone in for a landing — a personal preference of his.

Everything seemed to progress well but we quickly learned that the drone ended up capturing only video (see below) and not still photography. A few more attempts later, we sadly learned that we would not be able to collect still imagery that day. Apparently there was some incompatibility with the flight planning software and the drone. Not to fear, they agreed to return another day after a software update to collect the imagery. So perhaps the most important lesson of the day was that, despite the best laid plans of mice and men, things do not always go as planned with drone data collection. If you’re interested in learning some more about the foils and follies of drone data collection visit this handy resource:  http://knowbeforeyoufly.org/

We’ll have more to share with you on this process and, of course, what we are doing with the data soon.

 


Patrick Cunningham


Patrick Cunningham is the President of Blue Marble Geographics. He has two decades of experience in software development, marketing, sales, consulting, and project management.  Under his leadership, Blue Marble has become the world leader in coordinate conversion software (the Geographic Calculator) and low cost GIS software with the 2011 acquisition of Global Mapper. Cunningham is Chair of the Maine GIS Users Group, a state appointed member of the Maine Geolibrary Board, a member of the NEURISA board, a GISP and holds a masters in sociology from the University of New Hampshire.

What is BMUC? | An Embodiment of Blue Marble Values

Sam Knight speaks at BMUCChelsea E | Projections
Blue Marble Geographics’ Product Manager Sam Knight presents the latest features in Geographic Calculator 2017 to Blue Marble User Conference attendees in South Portland, Maine.

In my first couple of weeks as graphic designer at Blue Marble Geographics in 2016, I heard my coworkers use an unfamiliar term in our marketing meetings. They said things like: “do we have bee-muck speakers yet?”; or “when is the bee-muck e-mail going out?”; or “the bee-muck numbers are looking good so far.”

What the heck is a “bee-muck“?!

BMUC Amsterdam
Blue Marble Geographics took the BMUC experience to Amsterdam in spring of 2017.

I figured it was one of dozens of conferences that Blue Marble attends each year, like AUVSI or InterGeo, and not a term used to describe mud on a yellow and black insect pollinator. “Bee-muck” is actually how the Blue Marble team pronounces the acronym BMUC for Blue Marble User Conference, and BMUC is not just another event the company attends. It’s a series of conferences organized by Blue Marble in cities around North America (and sometimes the world) to show appreciation for the users of Blue Marble software. The one-day conferences offer users a chance to chat face-to-face with Blue Marble team members, to hear success stories from GIS peers, and to share a meal with everyone. I admit, I was skeptical when I heard the “share a meal” part. But when Blue Marble hosted a BMUC in Maine, I had the opportunity to take part in the rich experience the conferences actually have to offer.

Product News that Fosters a Collaborative Culture

At every BMUC, Blue Marble software specialists give talks on the latest product news. During the presentations at the Maine conference, I noticed one phrase that prefaced most of the announcements about new software developments — “We received requests for this feature.”

Patrick Cunningham speaks at BMUCChelsea E | Projections
Blue Marble Geographics President Patrick Cunningham welcomes attendees to the Blue Marble User Conference in Maine.

Global Mapper and Geographic Calculator have evolved into the cutting edge software they are today because of user feedback. Whether a user emails, calls, sends a Facebook message, or speaks to a staff member at a BMUC or other conference, the team at Blue Marble hears and considers what that user has to say. A couple of examples of user-requested features that were highlighted at the Maine BMUC were Global Mapper’s advanced attribute editor, which allows for streamlined editing of data assigned to map features; and the real-time hillshading feature, which allows for dynamic positioning of a light source by clicking and dragging a sun icon.

When asked about what new features of Global Mapper v19 came from user requests, Product Manager Sam Knight began listing them off:

  • The new attribute editor function
  • Playing multiple videos attached to a feature
  • The dynamic hillshading control
  • All the new raster band math formulae, which include Normalized Difference Snow Index (NDSI) and Advanced Vegetation Index (AVI)
  • Drag and drop docking for the 3D viewer and path profile
  • Exporting/importing flythrough paths

After giving this handful of examples, he stopped himself and said, “Actually, literally every significant new feature is a user request.”

The point I’m trying to make is that the product news shared at BMUCs not only keeps users in the loop, but it also fosters the collaborative culture that makes Blue Marble software great. It lets users know that they have a hand in improving these already powerful tools.

Alex Gray speaks at BMUCChelsea E | Projections
GIS Specialist Alex Gray of GEI Consultants Inc. presents on a hydrology analysis for which he used Global Mapper to create digital terrain models.

Peer-to-Peer Learning in the GIS Community

There are at least two guest speakers at every BMUC, who share their real-life experiences using Blue Marble products. These professionals come from a variety of GIS backgrounds — from oil and gas to filmmaking; from city planning to conservation. While members of the Blue Marble team bring their software expertise to the BMUC agenda, the stories from others in the GIS community add valuable outside perspectives.

Thea Youngs speaks at BMUCChelsea E | Projections
GIS Specialist Thea Youngs presents on how she uses Global Mapper for LiDAR processing in city projects for Portland, Maine.

At the Maine BMUC, attendees heard from GIS Specialist Thea Youngs, who uses Global Mapper for Portland city projects. She explained how the software fits in her workflow, and how fast it is to view and select an area of interest from a large point cloud. “Global Mapper helps with making LiDAR data play better with drafting software.” She also commended Global Mapper for its extensive list of supported file formats, since her work sometimes deals with older and less common formats.

Attendees also heard from GIS Specialist Alex Gray of GEI Consultants Inc., whose presentation focused on a hydrology analysis for which he created digital terrain models from a combination of LiDAR and sonar data in Global Mapper.

While both speakers use Global Mapper and the LiDAR Module for their powerful point cloud processing functionality, both work with very different workflows and could provide unique ideas on how to use the software. The presentations, as well as the variety of occupations in the BMUC audience, exemplified how versatile Global Mapper is and how BMUCs are a great place to share tips on how to use the software.

Let’s Call it Lunch, not “Networking”

It’s probably safe to say that the word “lunch” elicits a positive reaction from more people than the word “networking”. I mean, who can’t bond over a good sandwich?

BMUC lunchChelsea E | Projections
Attendees line up for lunch at the Maine Blue Marble User Conference.

During lunch at the Maine BMUC, attendees had the opportunity to share their own stories, ask more questions, discuss projects with their peers, and to make connections in their local GIS community. I was able to hear from attendees about what developments they’d like to see from Blue Marble in the near future, like the ability to create point clouds from drone imagery, which is actually something that Blue Marble is currently testing.

Other than providing lunch, Blue Marble also offers opportunities to win prizes such as T-shirts and a license of the latest version of Global Mapper. At the Maine BMUC, this opportunity came in the form of a “Name That Country” game, in which attendees had to identify countries from a series of slides.

An Affordable and Rich GIS Experience

After the conference, two thoughts struck me as I drank a beer with my co-workers and BMUC attendees who were able to join us for happy hour. My first thought: How cool is it that this small company can serve customers all over the world and still have intimate events like BMUCs? Second: BMUCs truly embody the user-focused mission of Blue Marble.

They are an affordable opportunity (only $25 to register) to gain insights from company experts and other GIS professionals; to meet new people in the GIS community; to win a copy of the latest version of Global Mapper; to have an opinion about a Blue Marble software and to have it heard; and did I mention lunch?

As I write this entry, the Blue Marble team is planning its BMUC 2018 schedule. Drop us a line at bmuc@bluemarblegeo.com if you’d like to see this experience come to your neck of the woods, and keep an eye on the BMUC page to find out where we will be next.

There’s an abundance of knowledge to be shared in the GIS and Blue Marble community, and BMUC is a tap on the barrel. Cheers!


Chelsea Ellis


Chelsea Ellis is a graphic designer and social media manager at Blue Marble Geographics. Her responsibilities range from creating the new button graphics for the redesigned interface of Global Mapper 18 to editing promotional videos; from designing print marketing material to scheduling social media posts. Prior to joining the Blue Marble team, Ellis worked in page layout and graphic design at Maine newspapers, and as a freelance designer and photographer.

Blue Marble Supports Scientific Research on Climate Change

Sun rising over EarthPixabay
Blue Marble supports the scientific research on climate change that has helped in the development of international climate treaties such as the Paris Accord.

Blue Marble Geographics is a geospatial software company with customers throughout the world in all types of industries. Our customers are typically, though not always, geoscientists across all disciplines who analyze the world and create products for their companies and organizations based on the results of their scientific work. Surveyors, software developers, soil scientists, academics, biologists, environmental scientists, engineers, geophysicists, geologists, hydrologists, cartographers and of course geographers are all using Blue Marble products to help us gain a better understanding of the natural mechanisms of the planet and the impact of human activity on these natural processes. Many are focused on measuring change in our world, specifically in the area of climate change. We stand with these scientists and support the research they have done, both directly and indirectly, to assist with the development and hopefully fulfillment of international climate treaties such as the Paris Climate Accord. Blue Marble accepts the findings of the vast majority of the global scientific community that unanimously concludes that climate change is exacerbated by increased concentrations of greenhouse gases that are the result of human activity.  This, we believe, is a proven fact as supported by the peer reviewed scientific community.

United States Politics and Climate Change

How Americans Think about Climate ChangeNew York Times
New York Times story: How Americans Think About Climate Change, in Six Maps

Unfortunately, there is a political constituency in the United States that has swayed some of the public into believing that this reality is not true. Recently, this issue came to the forefront when the current Administration decided to have the U.S. join Syria and Nicaragua as the only nations in the world that are not bound by the findings of the Paris Accord, despite overwhelming international and domestic public opinion.

The ongoing conflict between politics and science is one that many of our customers deal with on a daily basis and in the current political climate, these conflicts are becoming much more divisive.

Global Mapper COAST Measures Cost of Climate Change

Many users are familiar with the Global Mapper COAST extension, a free add-on to the software for measuring the financial impact of both severe coastal storms and sea level rise, both of which have been scientifically attributed to climate change. This tool is used to model impact from storms and sea level rise based on historical data and to create an adaption technology, such as a sea wall or a dam, to mitigate the effects of flooding. The costs of damage based on flooding and the costs of adaption are factored in to develop a return on investment or total cost of ownership calculation along with a GIS mapping model. Coastal communities are using this tool to make decisions about how to protect their assets or property of concern.

COAST software tool
The above output shows the results from a COAST analysis as displayed in Google Earth. The COAST (COastal Adaptation to Sea level rise Tool) software tool, built on the Global Mapper software developer toolkit, helps users answer questions in regards to the costs and benefits of actions and strategies to avoid damages from sea level rise and/or coastal flooding.

Historic data can be analyzed to gauge the most likely outcome with a given set of circumstances or, alternatively, it can be modeled to the subject’s belief in what will happen. The consultants for whom this extension was originally developed, found this to be a very useful feature when dealing with clients who wanted to argue that sea level rise is not occurring. It is a true statement of the times we live in when coastal communities aren’t prepared to acknowledge that flooding can be directly attributable to human-induced climate change, even after being presented with compelling evidence of an increased likelihood of future catastrophic flooding events. It is a strange contradiction.

Blue Marble Stands with Scientists

Today in the U.S. in particular we are faced with a government that not only refutes the findings and recommendations of the Paris Climate Accord, but that is actively attempting to silence and/or remove climate scientists from government along with restricting the work of the Environmental Protection Agency and other similar institutions. We see the effects of these efforts resulting in alt-Twitter accounts, whistle blower YouTube videos and unfortunately the potential for some scientists leaving their government jobs to pursue careers in the private sector where they can continue their work. Blue Marble supports these agencies and wants all of our customers to know that we value the Paris Climate Accord and the necessary and good work of all scientists. We thank you for your work and we’ve got your back!


Patrick Cunningham

Patrick Cunningham is the President of Blue Marble Geographics. He has two decades of experience in software development, marketing, sales, consulting, and project management.  Under his leadership, Blue Marble has become the world leader in coordinate conversion software (the Geographic Calculator) and low cost GIS software with the 2011 acquisition of Global Mapper. Cunningham is Chair of the Maine GIS Users Group, a state appointed member of the Maine Geolibrary Board, a member of the NEURISA board, a GISP and holds a masters in sociology from the University of New Hampshire.

Tone-Deaf Customer Service and How to Avoid It

The Blue Marble team
The Blue Marble team outside of the Blue Marble Geographics office in Hallowell, Maine in spring of 2016. The corporate culture at Blue Marble is one that is defined by a sense of day-to-day pride in wanting its customers to succeed.

If you were following the news recently, you probably heard some of the customer horror stories coming from United Airlines. First, there were the two young female passengers who were not allowed to board a flight because they were wearing leggings. Second, there was the doctor who was physically removed from a flight and bloodied in the process. Apparently, the removal of the doctor happened because the airline needed to bump four passengers in order to fly some crew members to Louisville. Both of these stories have some nuances to them I am sure, but there is no avoiding the issue that bothers me most about United as a company: both of these incidents reflect a solid tone-deafness to common sense customer service. Both look horrible from a PR perspective; one is sexism and the other is assault. Interactions like these get plastered all over social media and no amount of damage control can counter-act the horrible message they send to customers and prospective customers. Will United continue as a profitable business generating equity for shareholders? Probably. But at what cost to those profits? At what cost to their reputation? What about common decency and the way we are supposed to treat others? If the truth be told, these stories actually were not shocking to me, as I fly quite a bit and many of my colleagues do as well. Our experiences with United range from consistently rude employees to outright harassment. As a company, we have consciously avoided United Airlines (and the former Continental Airlines) for a few years now.

In order to avoid bad customer service decision making, an organization has to recognize the issues that create an atmosphere of utter tone-deafness. My experience with tone-deaf companies is that there are a number of customer service employees who are out-right hostile towards their customers. They appear to not like their jobs. They are possibly over-worked, under-paid, and either given too little power to make decisions or possibly too much. Think about the gate agent or manager who made the decision to stop offering travel vouchers and a hotel stay before the doctor was removed. They started at $400 and a hotel, but there were no takers so they increased it to $800 and a hotel stay. There were still no takers, so rather than increase the offer they randomly selected four passengers to be removed. One has to ask, why did they stop increasing the offer? The result of the fallout from all of this has turned into an out of court settlement that must be much more expensive than a travel voucher. But another question remains; why did they even board passengers if they knew they had over-sold it. If they had bumped people in the gate, whether those people liked it or not, United could have kept them from getting on the plane and likely defused the situation in a more humane manner. But furthermore, one might ask why airlines over-sell flights in the first place. Why is that legal? You shouldn’t be able to sell something you don’t have as a product. That entire concept to me is a catalyst for corporate cultural problems. However, let’s be clear this situation wasn’t even about overbooking, this was an issue where they needed to fly crew to the destination airport to run another flight, yet it is being framed in the context of overbooking which has been a persistent problem for customers for a few years now. If we try and deconstruct the issue of calling the police to physically remove a passenger that did not want to voluntarily give up their seat, what we have in the end are employees who are angry, frustrated and willing to take those frustrations out on their customers. I think companies like this have a problem when their employees do not believe in their product. They don’t care about providing a good customer experience because the message from corporate is to make as much money at whatever cost. This issue to me is the key behind developing poor corporate culture and, for United, that issue will not be easily fixed considering the size of the company.

Our corporate culture is one that is defined by a sense of day-to-day pride in what we do — an interest in our customers succeeding and the science they are tackling every day. We want our customers to succeed, and we want them to be happy with our products.

Blue Marble is a much different company than United. We’re a small company of technology experts located mostly in central Maine. Although we have remote employees across the country, the way we approach our customers has more to do with what it means to live and work in Maine than it does with working for a software company. But this runs deeper than the face of it. Our corporate culture is one that is defined by a sense of day-to-day pride in what we do — an interest in our customers succeeding and the science they are tackling every day. We want our customers to succeed, and we want them to be happy with our products. We like helping them solve their challenges. Yes, we have rules about how we sell our software. We have rules about how we license it. But if you have been a customer of Blue Marble or Global Mapper for a while you know that our rules evolve over time and that we really try to listen to every customer. It can be challenging to satisfy the varied perspectives of some of our customers:  the sole-proprietor surveyor who has been running his business on his own for thirty years on a tight budget versus the lead software procurement person for a multi-national corporation, or the remote sensing GIS government professional for an Africa-based agency. We strive to meet the needs of a diverse, global set of customers every day. Our global audience is where we are similar to United, but that is where it ends. The difference starts with caring about our reputation.

The Blue Marble Vice President of Sales Kris Berglund at the 2017 APPEA Conference and Exhibition. Blue Marble employees are empowered to support their customers, to do quality work, and to feel ownership in it.

I think there are two keys to being successful at that. The first are the products we sell.  Making quality products that solve a problem (at least for business software) is key. But taking pride in the product and standing behind it, as cheesy as it sounds, is essential. Secondly, empowering the people who support our customers to do quality work and to feel ownership in it. I will be the first to admit that this has been something I have had to learn how to do over the years. We work at it every day. I have surrounded myself with a solid management team, but we have also worked together to hire and promote good, smart people who actually want you (our customer) to succeed. If new hires do not buy into that, they don’t stick around. We don’t force it on them, however, we try to build that culture. It takes time. It takes practice. It takes a lot of practice actually. It takes pride as well. But it also means we can’t be tone-deaf. We listen to our employees and we listen to our customers.

All of us at Blue Marble want to make sure we’re doing everything we can to meet your needs so if you have a concern please email us at feedback (link to feedback@bluemarblegeo.com). We will be sure to respond. Thank you for being our customer.


Patrick Cunningham

Patrick Cunningham is the President of Blue Marble Geographics. He has two decades of experience in software development, marketing, sales, consulting, and project management.  Under his leadership, Blue Marble has become the world leader in coordinate conversion software (the Geographic Calculator) and low cost GIS software with the 2011 acquisition of Global Mapper. Cunningham is Chair of the Maine GIS Users Group, a state appointed member of the Maine Geolibrary Board, a member of the NEURISA board, a GISP and holds a masters in sociology from the University of New Hampshire.

Blue Marble is Traveling to Conferences and Public Training Events Around the Globe

Blue Marble Conferences and Training on a World Map

Blue Marble Geographics is a company of modest size but one that leaves a very large footprint. With customers and users throughout North America and in virtually every county in the world, the company’s technical and sales staff seem to be continually on the road. Seldom does a week go by that we aren’t bidding one colleague bon voyage while welcoming another back into the fold.

This photo contributed by Renier Balt shows new Certified Global Mapper Users at a public training in Mount Edgecombe, KZN, South Africa the first week of February 2017.

As a company that develops the foremost tools for creating visual representations of spatial data (maps, for the layperson) it seems only natural that we share our 2017 travel plans using this media. A cursory glance at the accompanying map reveals an obvious bias towards the Northeastern U.S., our home turf, so to speak, but it is also interesting that folks attending conferences in the Midwestern states have better-than-average chance of encountering a wandering Blue Marble staff member over the coming year.

Increasingly, our trips are taking us beyond these shores with Europe a frequent destination for 2017. As the popularity of the appropriately named Global Mapper continues to expand across the planet, look out for someone in a Blue Marble shirt at an event near you in the future.

For a frequently updated list of events Blue Marble is attending this year, click Here.

Top 5 Things Blue Marble Geographics is Grateful for in 2016

Happy New Year from Blue Marble Geographics!

We made some ambitious goals in 2016, ranging from rebranding our products to updating the look and feel of Global Mapper. It was challenging, but our team made it happen!

Here is a countdown of the top five things Blue Marble is grateful for in 2016:

 5 – A New Website

We needed a website to not only match our new and improved graphics and logos, but to reflect the ease-of-use found in our software. We redesigned our website to be easier to navigate, more mobile friendly, and overall more pleasing to the eye. We even incorporated more of the friendly faces of the people who work at Blue Marble.

Redesigned Blue Marble Geographics website
We cleaned up our website to be nicer to look at and easier to navigate. We updated our social media icons; added our new logo; created a new cart and login for customers; added new imagery from our software; added our new product logos; and used more house photography that features Blue Marble events and employees.

4 – The First Annual Blue Marble User Conference Road Show

In the month of March, Blue Marble staff members took to the road to bring the Blue Marble User Conference experience to as wide an audience as possible. We traveled to locations throughout the U.S. and Canada providing conference attendees with insight on current and future product developments as well as usability tips to help get the most out of Global Mapper and the Geographic Calculator. A variety of industry experts also joined us along the way to share their experience with Blue Marble technology.

 

Blue Marble training event and user conference
The 2016 Blue Marble User Conferences in Houston, Calgary, San Francisco, Boston, and Pittsburgh featured presentations from Bechtel Infrastructure, BSP Engineers, Inc., Pictometry, EnergyIQ, GEO1, and the Blue Marble Team.

3 – The Release of Global Mapper Mobile for iOS

In a significant development shift, we released a mobile version of our desktop GIS software. Global Mapper Mobile, originally an iOS app and soon to be available for Android devices, extends the reach of a traditional GIS by offering access to virtually all raster and vector spatial datasets where they are needed most: in the field or at a job site. Used in conjunction with the desktop version of Global Mapper, the mobile edition can display both raster and vector layers from any of the 250 supported formats while allowing field editing and markup.

 

Global Mapper for desktop and mobile
Global Mapper Mobile is a powerful GIS data viewing and field data collection application for iOS that utilizes the device’s GPS capability to provide situational awareness and locational intelligence for remote mapping projects.

2 – The Release of Global Mapper Version 18

Arguably the most significant release in the history of this renowned GIS software, version 18 introduced bold new graphics, reconfigured menus, and improved layer management. With our continued focus on optimizing the use of 3D data, it also offers full-range dynamic rendering of all loaded terrain or LiDAR data and supports the concurrent display of multiple terrain surfaces.

 

Redesigned Global Mapper
We redesigned and redeveloped Global Mapper for version 18.

1 – You: Our Users

You joined us for training sessions, visited us at conferences, followed us on social media, downloaded our software, shared your software stories with us, and gave us feedback on our products. 2016 would not have been a great year without you!

Attendees of Orlando, FL training
We had full attendance and received some great feedback at our Orlando training this year.

Thank you for all of your support, and we hope you continue to participate with us in 2017 in whatever way you are comfortable. We have more big plans to change the way the world uses and thinks about GIS but we need your help to do it.