Blue Got Mail – Reducing the vertex count of a vector file

Billy Noble, Applications Specialist at Blue Marble Geographics, answers questions that come into the technical support inbox. In this video, Billy demonstrates how to reduce the vertex count of a vector file in Global Mapper.

Using Global Mapper and Global Mapper Mobile to Prepare for a 186-Mile Bike Ride

After I crossed the finish line of the Trek Across Maine in 2018, I immediately signed up for the next ride without hesitation.

The cycling event takes place over three days and spans 180 miles — starting in the western mountains of Maine and ending on the state’s coast. It benefits the American Lung Association, which is why I chose it as my first cycling event to participate in. I rode in honor of my grandmother who had COPD.

Me in Belfast, Maine after finishing my first Trek Across Maine in June 2018.

When I finished the 2018 Trek, I was so excited that:

  1. I survived!
  2. I got to see a beautiful part of the state I live in
  3. I would be so much more confident on the next Trek because now I knew the route

But then the Trek organizers changed the route for 2019. *womp, womp, womp*

Instead of starting at Sunday River and ending in Belfast, the 2019 Trek would start and end in Brunswick, making a 186-mile loop in central Maine. The route wouldn’t “trek across” anymore, it would “trek around”.

On top of learning about the new route, I hurt my knee badly in January while doing a simple leg stretch (lame!) which was a training-changing injury. So, with a lowered confidence, I wanted to learn more about the new route.

Here’s how I used Global Mapper to visualize and mentally prepare for the 2019 Trek, and how I used Global Mapper Mobile to record my 186-mile journey.

Using Online Data and the Path Profile Tool in Global Mapper

The Trek provides GPX files for each day of the ride on the organization’s website. I downloaded these files; dragged them into Global Mapper; and uploaded elevation data, satellite imagery, and a street map from Global Mapper’s free online data sources.

Using the elevation data, I created path profile views of each of the three riding days. This allowed me to see which of the days would have the largest climbs and where those hills were located. After only a few minutes looking at the data, I could see that Day 2 would be the most challenging. Only ten miles into the 62-mile day, there would be a 375-foot climb, four 225-foot hills, and another 375-footer at mile 45.

Day 1 of the Trek Across Maine
Here’s the elevation of Day 1, the route from Brunswick to Lewiston, Maine.
Day 2 of the Trek Across Maine
Here’s Day 2 from Lewiston to Waterville, which looked like (and proved to be) the hardest day of Trek 2019.
Day 3 of the Trek Across Maine
Here’s Day 3, which appeared to be much easier than Day 2 with only one 250-foot climb at mile 31.

I also explored the “design” of the route by looking at it over satellite imagery to see the vegetation and water bodies I would be riding by. Although Day 2 appeared to be the toughest, it also looked as if it would provide some beautiful views over lakes in the rural Fayette and Readfield area.

Satellite imagery and the Trek Across Maine route in Global Mapper
The three-day route of the Trek Across Maine over satellite imagery. Day 1 is red, Day 2 is green, and Day 3 is blue.

Planning Training Rides in Global Mapper

Looking at the path profiles helped me plan my own rides for training. After talking to some cyclists and looking up popular routes in my area, I planned a 28-mile training ride from my apartment in Portland to Gray that included a 375-foot climb — a hill similar to those two big ones on Day 2.

Using the Digitizer in Global Mapper and my online data, I mapped out this training ride, too.

Training ride from Portland to Gray, Maine
Here is the 28-mile training ride I planned with the computer cursor hovering over the top of the 375-foot climb around mile 10.

Exporting my Map for the Road

In addition to using Global Mapper to look at the path profiles of each day of the Trek, I also used it to add vector points representing each rest stop along the route. After adding these points, I was ready to export my map as a Global Mapper Mobile Package (GMMP) file. Global Mapper 21 and Global Mapper Mobile v2 will allow for a native projection to be retained in a GMMP file. So as I exported, I chose to retain my projection, in my case just for visualization purposes.

I uploaded this file to my Global Mapper Mobile app, and planned on adding data to it while on the 186-mile ride.

Exporting a Global Mapper Mobile Package
Exporting a Global Mapper Mobile Package file from Global Mapper Mobile.

Picture Points and the Measuring Tool in Global Mapper Mobile

June 14, 2019 was the first day of the Trek. I had my map in my Global Mapper Mobile app, and I was ready to start documenting my ride!

There are a few ways I could add photos to my map in Global Mapper Mobile. I could create points on my map from geotagged photos, or I could take photos right in the app and add them as attributes to previously existing points. Since I take so many photos with my iPhone camera, I chose to add photos using the Picture Point Create Mode — creating points from photos I had taken outside of Global Mapper Mobile.

Creating a picture point in Global Mapper Mobile
Here are screenshots of the process of creating a picture point on my map in Global Mapper Mobile. I added a photo of my coworker Jeff and me at the second stop on Day 3.

I originally planned on using the app primarily for documenting my ride, but I found it useful in other instances.

When Day 2 really turned out to be the hardest day, I opened Global Mapper Mobile at the third rest stop to see the distance between me and Colby College — the destination of that day. It was a long 21.6 kilometers (13.4 miles) to ride with sore seat-bones and my disappointment in the shortage of fluffernutter sandwiches at this stop.

Using the Measure tool in Global Mapper Mobile
Using the Measuring tool, I figured out how much further I had to go to get to the last stop of Day 2 of the Trek Across Maine.

Global Mapper and Global Mapper Mobile: Easy as Riding a Bike

As Day 2 proved to me, riding a bike isn’t always easy. But GIS software can be!

I am not a GIS professional. I know that editing and exporting a simple map of a bike route isn’t rocket science. But Global Mapper’s user-friendliness made that non-rocket science even easier.

It took just a few minutes of viewing the route with elevation, street, and satellite data to get a better idea of what the 2019 Trek would be like. Even though exporting my Trek map to Global Mapper Mobile was the first time I had used the desktop and mobile apps in tandem, it was a very straight-forward process.

Uploading a map from Global Mapper Mobile to the Global Mapper desktop
A screenshot of the final photo I added to my map in Global Mapper Mobile. It’s a photo of my team and I just after crossing the finish line.

When I returned back to the office after my second Trek Across Maine, I exported my GMMP file from Global Mapper Mobile and imported it to my Global Mapper desktop. I clicked the vector point labeled “Finish Line” with the Feature Info tool, and up popped a photo of me and my Trek Across Maine team.

Immediately after that picture was taken, I signed up for Trek 2020 without hesitation.


Chelsea Ellis


Chelsea Ellis is Graphics and Content Coordinator at Blue Marble Geographics. Her responsibilities range from creating the new button graphics for the redesigned interface of Global Mapper 18 to editing promotional videos; from designing print marketing material to scheduling social media posts. Prior to joining the Blue Marble team, Ellis worked in graphic design at Maine newspapers, and as a freelance photographer.

Where in the World June 2019 Answers

How Well Did You Do?

Name the country – Bangladesh

Bangladesh

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Name the body of water – Gulf of Aden

Gulf of Aden

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Name the mountain – Mauna Loa

Mauna Loa

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Name the capital city – Washington DC

Washington DC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Name the UNESCO World Heritage Site – Venice and its Lagoon

Venice and its Lagoon

 

Where in the World Geo-Challenge — August 2019

View the form at Google Forms >

Global Mapper Tutorials: Generating Contours

In this short video tutorial, we explore Global Mapper’s contour creation capability and we discuss the various option and settings that can applied during the process. Use the links below to jump ahead to a specific section:

  • – Contour Generation Options (0 – 7:39)
  • – Smoothing Selected Contour Lines (7:409:28)
  • – Removing Polygons by Line Length (9:2911:27)
  • – Contour Labels and Index Contours (11:2814:06)
  • – Defining Zoom Level Ranges (14:0719:05)
  • – Generating Elevation Polygons with the Create Contours Tool (19:0622:15)

If you have questions about this topic or or about any other Global Mapper feature or function, email geohelp@bluemarblegeo.com If you are new to Global Mapper, you can download a free trial version at globalmapper.com/download

Top Five New Features in Geographic Calculator SP1

 

Chelsea E | Projections
New dropdown to easily access recently used files in Geographic Calculator 2019 SP1.

 

In early June, we introduced the first service pack update of Geographic Calculator 2019. The new features and functions in this version of Blue Marble’s coordinate conversion software are designed to improve its user-friendliness, accessibility, and efficiency. Although some changes seem slight, such as easier access to recently opened files, they have a big impact on user’s productivity in the software.

Here is a list of the top five new features of Geographic Calculator 2019 SP1:

1. Support for Open Document Spreadsheet (ODS) format

Opening an ODS file in Geographic Calculator 2019 SP1.

In Geographic Calculator 2019 SP1, we added support for the open-source table format Open Document Spreadsheets (ODS) to make Geographic Calculator more accessible to OpenOffice users.

2. Support for batch processing of Area Calculation jobs

Batch processing Area Calculation jobs in Geographic Calculator 2019 SP1.

Before the 2019 service pack, users had to process Area Calculation jobs one by one. In Geographic Calculator 2019 SP1, we’ve added batch support for performing mass calculations for multiple area files.

3. Support for the new Equal Earth projection

The new Equal Earth projection in Geographic Calculator 2019 SP1.

In 2018, Bojan Savic, Bernhard Jenny, and Tom Patterson invented the Equal Earth projection that is inspired by the Robinson projection but retains the relative size of areas. We’ve added this new projection to the long list of projections available in Geographic Calculator.

4. Bulk Export to WKT for coordinate systems

 

Chelsea E | Projections
Bulk exporting coordinate systems together in one WKT file in Geographic Calculator 2019 SP1.

 

Users can now bulk export multiple coordinate systems (or coordinate transformations) together in one WKT file in Geographic Calculator 2019 SP1. This supports interoperability of data across platforms where coordinate systems may or may not be standardized. You can now manage your coordinate systems in Geographic Calculator, and then quickly export them to standardize the options in your other mapping packages for display and analysis.

5. Updates to the Project Manager

 

Project Manager in Geographic Calculator 2019 SP1
The new Project Manage in Geographic Calculator 2019 SP1 now shows the status of jobs.

 

The Project Manager in this service pack version has been updated to be the one-stop-shop for users to process and see the status of jobs in one location. In previous versions of Geographic Calculator, process status was located at the bottom of the interface, taking up screen space.

Over the past 26 years, Geographic Calculator has become an industry leader for accurate coordinate reference system and datum management. This most recent version of the software streamlines user accessibility with new batch and bulk export options, and the additional support for universal and open-source formats.

 

Where in the World May 2019 Answers

How Well Did You Do?

May’s Geo-Challenge included a test of who had been paying attention to the news. The country we asked you to identify was North Macedonia, which until earlier this year, was referred to as the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. Congratulations to randomly selected Global Mapper winner, Frank O. Nitsche from the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University. Frank was one of the many who provided the correct name and who also correctly recognized the four additional locations. Scroll down for the answers and click here to see how well you do in June’s challenge.

Name the capital city – Oslo

Oslo

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Name the country – North Macedonia

North Macedonia

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Name the island – Baffin Island

Baffin Island

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Name the river – Murray River

Murry River

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Name the lake – Lake Malawi

Lake Malawi

 

Where in the World Geo-Challenge — June 2019

View the form at Google Forms >

Blue Marble Monthly – May 2019

 

 

NEWS  |  Global Mapper Mobile Available through IGAPP

The Innovative GEOINT Application Provider Program (IGAPP) offers an efficient way for the US Intelligence Community and Department of Defense personnel to access the latest mobile technology. Recently, an enhanced version of Global Mapper Mobile for both Android and iOS devices was added to the list of applications available on the IGAPP store.

 

 

PROJECTIONS  |  Got a Drone? Now What?

It seems that every where you turn, someone is doing something interesting with a drone. Arguably one of the most significant technological innovations of the last decade, drones or UAVs have the potential to play an important role in the broad field of mapping and spatial data management. In a recent blog post, Blue Marble’s Outreach and Training Manager David McKittrick explored some of the ways in which Global Mapper’s functionality has evolved to meet the needs of this burgeoning technology.

 

BLUE GOT MAIL | Removing the Collar from a Raster Map

This month, we reach deep into the technical support mailbag and pull out a letter from a customer who asks how to remove the collar from their raster topographic map in Global Mapper. Once again, Billy Noble is on hand to show us how this is done.

 

DID YOU KNOW  |  3DEP Data Available in Global Mapper

Here in the US, we are fortunate to have open and free access to a wide variety of spatial datasets. One such data service, which is now available in the Online Data list in Global Mapper v.20 and newer, is the USGS-managed 3D Elevation Program (3DEP) data. This LiDAR-based DEM is derived from multiple sources with horizontal resolutions up to 1-meter. Click below to see some simple images of this data.

 

Where in the World Geo-Challenge

Once in a while, we include potential catch in the monthly Geo-Challenge; a location that could be easily misconstrued. Alas, not many of you were fooled into thinking that the desert in April’s challenge was Gobi Desert. Click here to find out the correct answer and to see how well you did with the four other locations. The first name pulled from the hat and winner of a copy of Global Mapper for April was Hugo Ahlenius from Nordpil. Ready for another challenge? Click below to see if you can recognize the latest five locations.

 

See complete terms and conditions here.

EVENTS  |  GeoBusiness and GEOINT

Over the next few weeks, we will be setting up shop at two of the more important conferences in the Blue Marble calendar. GeoBusiness in London on May 21 and 22 and the GEOINT Symposium in San Antonio, Texas from June 2 to 4. If you plan to attend either of these events, be sure to stop by the Blue Marble booth.

 

Click here for more information on our scheduled training classes, or visit the Blue Marble Events page for more information on upcoming events.

Blue Got Mail – Removing the Collar from Raster Topographic Maps in Global Mapper

This month, we reach deep into the technical support mailbag and pull out a letter from a customer who asks how to remove the collar from their raster topographic map in Global Mapper. Once again, Billy Noble is on hand to show us how this is done.